Komemeister

Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)

R 260.00
  • Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)
  • Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)
  • Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)
  • Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)
  • Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)
  • Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)
  • Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)
  • Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)
  • Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)

Komemeister

Premium Sushi Rice (Ginbouzu cultivar)

R 260.00

To make perfect sushi needs good quality rice, of the right type. Good sushi rice usually has a slightly shorter grain than other Japanese rice types and also has the following characteristics:

  • Low to moderate stickiness, but still enough to make it easy to grip;
  • Some elasticity while having a crispy texture;
  • Easy to mix with a traditional rice paddle;
  • Hard enough to prevent disintegration when adding vinegar and shaping;
  • Good absorption of vinegar.

Sushi rice is usually aged between one and four years to ensure it is not too moist. The 'ginbouzu' (which roughly translates as 'silver monk') cultivar is highly prized by sushi chefs in Japan. We sell four varieties in 1kg bags, each from a different prefecture and with a different hardness:

  • Mai (Akita Prefecture – hardest): R220 p/kg
  • Miyabi (Toyama Prefecture -  hard): R300 p/kg
  • Ohgi (Niigata Prefecture – soft): R250 p/kg
  • Hodakara (Hokkaido – sticky): R200 p/kg
All four varieties are available to buy in 30kg bags (on a pre-order basis). If you wish to make your own blend, which is what sushi chefs in Japan often do, special blends can also be ordered in 30kg bags.
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To make perfect sushi needs good quality rice, of the right type. Good sushi rice usually has a slightly shorter grain than other Japanese rice types and also has the following characteristics:

  • Low to moderate stickiness, but still enough to make it easy to grip;
  • Some elasticity while having a crispy texture;
  • Easy to mix with a traditional rice paddle;
  • Hard enough to prevent disintegration when adding vinegar and shaping;
  • Good absorption of vinegar.

Sushi rice is usually aged between one and four years to ensure it is not too moist. The 'ginbouzu' (which roughly translates as 'silver monk') cultivar is highly prized by sushi chefs in Japan. We sell four varieties in 1kg bags, each from a different prefecture and with a different hardness:

  • Mai (Akita Prefecture – hardest): R220 p/kg
  • Miyabi (Toyama Prefecture -  hard): R300 p/kg
  • Ohgi (Niigata Prefecture – soft): R250 p/kg
  • Hodakara (Hokkaido – sticky): R200 p/kg
All four varieties are available to buy in 30kg bags (on a pre-order basis). If you wish to make your own blend, which is what sushi chefs in Japan often do, special blends can also be ordered in 30kg bags.