Takesan

Kishibori Soy Sauce

R 250.00
  • Kishibori Soy Sauce
  • Kishibori Soy Sauce
  • Kishibori Soy Sauce
  • Kishibori Soy Sauce
  • Kishibori Soy Sauce

Takesan

Kishibori Soy Sauce

R 250.00

Kishibori-shoyu is soy sauce which uses the time-honoured combination of selected whole soy beans, wheat and sun-dried salt as its ingredients, and has been brewed naturally and slowly, using the traditional honjozu method, in cedar barrels throughout four seasons of one year.

It is classified as koikuchi (濃口), or ‘dark mouth’ soy sauce, which produces three distinctive elements ーa unique and good smell, glossiness and a rich umami taste.

For daily use, it is very versatile and is suited as a condiment, dipping sauce for sashimi, a marinade for grilling, or to add umami flavour to cooked dishes.

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It is said that the history of producing soy sauce on the island of Shōdoshima can be traced back more than 400 years, to Japan’s Bunroku (文禄) Era (1592 – 1596).

At that time, the Seto Inland Sea was a key sea route and Shodoshima was well-known for its salt production. The enterprising islanders of Shōdoshima, after experiencing Japan’s first soy sauce, Kishu Yuasa, began to import soy beans and wheat, and combined it with the quality sun-dried salt already available. This was the beginning of soy sauce production in Shōdoshima, where, thanks to the mild climate it has grown to one of Japan’s most well-known soy sauce producing areas.

TAKESAN is one of 14 members of the Shōdoshima Shoyu Association, and of the 3,000 wooden barrels still in use for fermenting across Japan, over 1,000 are on this small island, with a surface area of only 153 km2.

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Kishibori-shoyu is soy sauce which uses the time-honoured combination of selected whole soy beans, wheat and sun-dried salt as its ingredients, and has been brewed naturally and slowly, using the traditional honjozu method, in cedar barrels throughout four seasons of one year.

It is classified as koikuchi (濃口), or ‘dark mouth’ soy sauce, which produces three distinctive elements ーa unique and good smell, glossiness and a rich umami taste.

For daily use, it is very versatile and is suited as a condiment, dipping sauce for sashimi, a marinade for grilling, or to add umami flavour to cooked dishes.

----------------------------------------------

It is said that the history of producing soy sauce on the island of Shōdoshima can be traced back more than 400 years, to Japan’s Bunroku (文禄) Era (1592 – 1596).

At that time, the Seto Inland Sea was a key sea route and Shodoshima was well-known for its salt production. The enterprising islanders of Shōdoshima, after experiencing Japan’s first soy sauce, Kishu Yuasa, began to import soy beans and wheat, and combined it with the quality sun-dried salt already available. This was the beginning of soy sauce production in Shōdoshima, where, thanks to the mild climate it has grown to one of Japan’s most well-known soy sauce producing areas.

TAKESAN is one of 14 members of the Shōdoshima Shoyu Association, and of the 3,000 wooden barrels still in use for fermenting across Japan, over 1,000 are on this small island, with a surface area of only 153 km2.